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Always hungry,Why?

Always Feeling Hungry? You Might Be Simply Thirsty You’ve eaten lunch. You felt really full. But two hours later, you feel hungry again. Then you go to get a pack of snacks. Gradually you’re gaining weight. And you ask…what’s happening? Why my appetite is growing so fast? You start to suspect if you have parasite in your body, or if you have diabetes. All these are possible. But most of the time, you’re just thirsty. 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated and don’t even know it. And the problem is, most people can’t tell the difference between hunger and thirst. What? Even a kid would be able to tell the differences? Look at the signs of hunger and signs of thirst below first. signs of hunger and thrist 1.feeling weak                                                                  1.feeling weak   2.being irretable                                                                2..being irretable 3.headache                                                                      3.headache                       4.rumbling stomatch                                                          4.dry mouth As you can see, 3 out of 4 common signs of hunger and thirst are the same. What’s more, the part of the brain that deals with hunger and thirst feelings is the same. With the same part interpreting both signals, it becomes confusing to offer the perfect solution. So, how not to be tricked? One tip is that feelings of true hunger come gradually, but not suddenly. When in doubt, always guess in favor of hydration. It’s unlikely that you’ll ever over hydrate but it’s always so easy to overeat. Make it a habit. Drink a glass of water or herbal tea at least 30 minutes before a meal or snack. This way, you’ll be more aware of the true extent of your appetite, you’ll absorb the water more effectively, and you won’t dilute your stomach acid while it’s trying to digest. Dehydration may play a bigger role in your life than you realize. Luckily, it’s an easy fix. Learn to drink more water and not only will you find that your hunger cravings are reduced, but you’ll also feel better in general!

Late as usual

late as usual You know the scene. You have a meeting and you’re nearly ready. By your estimation, you have time to change your outfit a few times, iron your shirt, put the wash on, feed the cat, and eat breakfast. Then you look at the time, and you’re already five minutes late. There’s a huge dash for the door along with yelps of pejoratives and tripping over the cat. Time management can be a challenge for anyone, but some people (you know who you are!) have more of a problem with it than others. Hopefully, this little tip will help us all get to that meeting on time with every hair in place. The pressure of having to leave at a certain time can mean that we rebel. The thought that we ‘should’ be somewhere can lead part of us into not wanting to do it. In order to change your relationship with time, you’ll need to relax. To do this, simply estimate how long it might take for you to get ready. Here’s the clincher; make sure you don’t estimate the amount of time you might need on a good day. Estimate how long you’d need on a bad day to get ready. Be prepared for bad traffic, or an annoying Facebook notification, or the dishwasher flooding your apartment. Practice imagining yourself going through your morning with plenty of time and ease. It might not happen straight away, but if you visualize it enough times, rather than your inner voice saying ‘pfft, yeah, that will never happen’, it will begin to say ‘I like the sound of this’. Seeing a positive outcome means you will likely change your whole routine. Being able to see the real benefits of being on time allows you to feel more at ease with being on time, or even early!

Brands leveraging Instagram for marketing

How indian brands like 'paper boat' and startups like 'rentomojo' are leveraging instagram to the fullest to achieve thier marketing objevtives.

culture at college

presentation from business communication class. talks about cultural diversity on campus

Career paths

If you hate your office A lot of people like working but hate offices: They can't stand uncomfortable clothes, or being inside all day, or the forced sociability around the water cooler. I am one of those people. It's the predictability that bothers me-there's something about knowing where you're going to be, every single day except weekends and holidays, that in my opinion is just a roadmap to the grave.  Fortunately, I've always been able to make a living in fields not tied to offices, and that kind of flexibility is even more available to young people these days: "We are seeing a preference to work remotely, or in the gig economy, and that's especially true for young, educated millennials in cities-and that's usually the first place we see the evolution of the economy," says Andrew Hanson, a senior research analyst at the Center for Education and the Workforceat Georgetown University. So that got me thinking: What are the best fields for people who don't want to be tied to a desk?  According to Anna Bray, a career counselor at Jody Michaels Associates , a Chicago-based firm that provides career coaching, that answer largely depends on why you don't want to work in an office: Are you not a computer person, but still like working with a team? Is it commuting that bugs you? Is it something as apparently minor as spending the day under fluorescent lights? Bray says, "Some people don't want to be tied to a desk, and some people want to be outdoors or at least have some outdoors elements in their day." Bray spends her day teasing out the nitty-gritty of exactly how people want to spend their working lives and what they're trying to avoid, and sometimes her clients surprise themselves (and her) by stumbling on career paths they never knew existed. If you, or your kid, are casting about for direction, consider the ideas below, culled from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' ratings for " outdoor work " and " general physical activity " and from a discussion with Andrew Hanson. For good measure, I've included BLS's employment outlook-but take this with a grain of salt. It projects that the field of "actor" will increase by 10%, faster than the national average, and I can't see encouraging a child to get into theater by telling them that it's a sturdy career. Gardening, grounds-keeping, and nursery and greenhouse managers Nursery and greenhouse managing has a "bright outlook" rating from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and a 96 out of a 100 rating for work done out of doors. Landscaping and groundskeeping is 100 out of 100 and also enjoys a bright outlook. Grounds maintenanceis projected to grow by 7%, or about average, by 2024. If you're a green-thumb kind of person and like being outside, this might be the career for you.  Hospitality Hospitality, or working in restaurants, hotels, and tourist destinations, is for those grads who dislike office jobs but are still pretty social and like being part of a team. BLS rates that lodging managers have a job growth at about 8%, or about average, through 2024. The Cornell School of Hotel Management offers undergrad and graduate degrees in hotel management, which will give the applicant a leg up. (One note: hospitality doesn't tend to be very recession-proof. )  Medicine  If you're doctor, a nurse, a physician's assistant, an occupational therapist, a speech-language pathologist, and so on, you could spend a lot of time in an office, if you want to. But you can also be in a hospital setting, a school, or on the go as an EMT or paramedic. "Healthcare is the fastest-growing sector over the last decade," says Hanson. "Nursing is huge and one of the most lucrative. And some of the allied health fields (respiratory therapists, phlebotomists, etc.) don't require bachelor's degrees." Most practicing medical professionals aren't desk-bound. BLS rates EMT/paramedic as 96 out of 100 for outdoors work and it has a bright outlook -24%, or much faster than average. Physical therapy is even brighter, at 34% by 2024, and physician's assistantclocks in at 30%.  Construction and the trades Want to be outside and not be bothered with water-cooler chat? "Even with the decline in manufacturing, there are still a lot of blue-collar jobs," says Hanson. "Many do require some post-secondary education, like a certificate, or if you want to be a supervisor, you'll need a bachelor's or an MBA." Or be a roofer , to which BLS assigns a "bright outlook" and notes that you will be outside every single day. Because you're putting on a roof! My family was in construction trades; just the other day I was lamenting my desk-bound job and wishing I spent more time sitting on the roof. There aren't a lot of women represented, but that's changing: There are programs that prepare women for non-traditional employmentand the government sponsors registered apprenticeships for the skilled trades. Mechanics also get to avoid the office and work with their hands; if I had a mechanically inclined, office-averse kid, I'd suggest they look into being a wind-turbine service technician . Teaching/Academia Teaching, at the K-12 level and beyond, is great for people who want to be part of an institution and a community but don't want to be trapped at a computer filing TPS reports. Both elementary and high school teachers have an average job outlook, and the field ofpost-secondary teaching is projected to grow 13%, faster than average-though it is noted that hiring likely will be for part-time faculty. Adapted physical education teachers(creating and implement a PE curriculum for children with disabilities) has a particularly bright outlook. Forestry Conservation scientists and foresters have an average job outlook and good ratings on BLS for outdoors work. This sounds particularly awesome if you're an outdoorsy, tree-hugger kind of person, and are willing to gamble on there actually being forests and parks in a few years.  Science I once knew a family of field biologists who spent half the year on research expeditions and the other half teaching and writing for grants. It seemed like a pretty great life (one was a tropical marine biologist, if you want to feel some major envy.) BLS hasenvironmental scientists and specialists at an 11% growth (faster than average) andzoologist and wildlife biologist at 4% growth, or slower than average. But if you're choosing between science and acting, I'm going to say science is probably the safer bet.  Travel and transportation Bus drivers and truckers are projected to grow at about an average rate, so if you're fine with the sitting but still not especially social, this could be the job for you. (It looks like not a few truckers travel with a co-driver and their dogs , which might be an upside.) Flight attendants obviously don't work in an office, but nonetheless have to be social, wear uncomfortable clothes, are not outside, and certainly have commutes. BLS projects their job rate at 2%, which is not terrific, but on the flip side, you get to see a lot of cool places.  Police work/fire fighters/law enforcement A good deal of law enforcement is paperwork, but one is also out and about in the community. It's stressful and demanding work, and BLS projects it will grow at 4% (slower than average) but notes that "the continued desire for public safety is expected to lead to new openings for officers, although demand may vary by location." Police work also offers the opportunity for humanitarian and social work that shapes public policy: I was intrigued to see this story on how police officers are fighting the opioid epidemic by using more humane and community-oriented strategies than mass arrests. Retail The retail sector has grown as the manufacturing sector has declined, says Hanson, but while there are a lot of jobs, they aren't necessarily good jobs. Retail workers haven't benefitted from the protection of unions the way that manufacturing workers did. "You have to be a superstar to get a good job in retail," he says, "but there are still a lot of good jobs in management and finance." So if you like retail-being on your feet, helping people, working with a team-and feel like this the career for you, you might want to 1) get the bachelor's or MBA that will help you move up the ranks, or 2) get really good at union organizing. Even the recent moves toward increasing the minimum wage, Hanson says, "is not a substitute for a union wage." The retail sector is projected to grow at 7%, or an average rate, by 2024. The arts No, not being a stage actor. But according to Hanson, "We're seeing the rise of video and film outside of the major production companies"-from advocacy groups to media organizations to advertising. He notes that the people filling these jobs are not only creative types (arts and film majors), but also "a lot of folks with communications backgrounds, or social media marketing backgrounds." If a job seeker wants combine creative skills, teamwork, and digital film and TV experience, this might be a path for them. BLS puts film and video editors and camera operators at an 11%, or above average, growth. So here's something interesting: When I asked Hanson and Bray their one piece of advice for job seekers, they both said the same thing: Be flexible. Bray had a client who didn't want to be tied to an office who came up with two equally interesting career paths for himself: green-energy jobs, or opening up a bar/restaurant destination in the Caribbean. (My opinion is: Always take the career path that puts you in the Caribbean.) Another client, a games aficionado, is trying out designing and operating escape rooms . Bray says, "have fun with the process. The more you relax into it and have fun, the more possibilities will start to exist." Hanson counsels a similar mindset, with the added caveat to maybe just forget about the whole "passion" thing: "Our bias is to 'follow your passion,' but when we enter the workplace, we get surprised at the day-to-day grind of it. Passion builds over time when you do something you're good at. Be ready to be surprised, to be flexible. Do something that can provide value for others."

SoP

Write that winning SoP Your statement of purpose should make you stand out.  Some pointers to drafting that polished essay, and pitfalls you must avoid.

Rhetorical analysis

Hey all! This is a typical example of assessing one's Facebook profile. The rhetorical assessment of one's own activity on social media websites would matter as it's how the bigger world sees us.  Enjoy reading it.

Indian Poultry Farms Breeding Superbugs

A small research on news.

Lean Manufacturing (Total Quality Management)

Lean Manufacturing (Total Quality Management)

Ergonomics in Transportation (Bus)

Ergonomics in Transportation (Bus)

legitimacy of Sonu Nigam's Concern

It was the Monday morning when Sonu Nigam, the prominent Bollywood singer tweeted his displeasure for the use of loudspeakers at religious places for prayers. And as per routine we Indians jumped in and divided the discussion on religious lines. Twitter exploded, with many came in support where as many others took offence and branded him as anti-Muslim. One of the Muslim clerics from Kolkata took this controversy to the height of stupidity and announced a reward of rupee 10 lakh for anyone who shaves the head of Sonu Nigam and garlands him with old shoes. It’s a matter of serious concern that Fatwas are becoming more common than corruption in India! Sonu Nigam, master in his field gave the most epic reply, shaved his head and asked cleric to give Rs 10 lakh to his Muslim barber. The response from cleric is still to come but hope he learned his lesson. But as the drama continued, the main issue lagged behind and hypocrisies surrounded the debate. The basic question was how logical is this to disturb someone’s morning sleep on the name of religion? Be it Azaan in mosque,   Ardas in gurudwara or Aarti in temples. We Indians are little lazy about acknowledging the impact of pollution. We kept on polluting Ganga until it became impossible to recognize and then launched a multi crore scheme to clean her. We kept on polluting the air and then suddenly blamed government for its inactiveness when Delhi chocked. But we are still to acknowledge the psychological impact of noise pollution. We claim to be Indian first but deep down our heart most of us are more of Hindus or Muslims or anything else but Indian. Most of us still respect our Geeta or Koran, more than we respect our constitution. You don’t believe me? So let me tell you what constitution has to say about the use of loud speakers.  The Division Bench of Justice Abhay Oka and Justice A.A. Sayed of Bombay High court on 16th of August, 2016 said, ‘Religious places could use loudspeakers only with prior permission’. The court, hearing the petitions and PILs on the rising noise pollution in the city, in its order said that Rule 5 of Noise Pollution Rule is Constitutional and state has to abide by it. The Rule says loudspeakers or public address system shall not be used except on obtaining written permission from the concerned authority.  The Rule also says that except indoors; auditoria, conference rooms, community halls and banquet halls, a loudspeaker or a public address system shall not be used at night i.e. from 10pm to 6am! The court further said non-compliance with these rules would attract an imprisonment of 5 years and a fine up to Rs. 1 lakh. Now, we witness such rules violated on daily basis and we choose to ignore it. But one day, out of utter frustration somebody pointed it out and calls it ‘dadagiri’ and we lost our cool! Seriously! Where is Sonu Nigam wrong? For pointing out something illegal? C’mon India, you can do better! Please go through the facts before getting divided on the ground of religion and play in the hand of few.    

Operating system

Operating system  Operating system is a program  or software which act as a interface between the     user  and a hardware of a computer system.